Enchanting worlds

It was the social theorist Max Weber who identified progressive disenchantment as an underlying process of modernity. More recently, this creed of modern thinking has increasingly been challenged. Thus, enchantment often evokes the sublime and refers to an aura of authentic presence. Moreover, enchantment has been used as an analytical lense to look at consumer culture as well as new worlds of work. Accordingly, symbolic manipulation is used to enchant customers and employees. Enchanting worlds

Smelly wheels: In search of alternatives

Visual representations of smell are one of the core themes of our presence on Instagram: Wheel, circle, and pie have recently appeared as recurring and influential visual metaphors. The fragrance wheel created by Michael Edwards is perhaps the most prominent example these days. But the history of visualizations demonstrates that this is only one example out of many.  The visual metaphor of the circle or the wheel has been used to classify urine smells. The colour, smell, and even taste of urine was used to both identify particular illnesses and provide patient prognoses, from Hippocrates to the Victorian era. The practice, called uroscopy or uromancy, was, according to the Doctor’s Review, “once the number-one way to diagnose disease — and predict the future”.

Smelly wheels: In search of alternatives

 

Smell may not seem a profound enough problem to dominate all the life sciences, but it contains, piece by piece, all the mysteries.

– Lewis Thomas