Rotten eggs on the road?

A car is a means of transportation. This is obvious. What is less obvious however is that the car shows specific sensory or even olfactory qualities: A car uses smelly petrol or diesel. Driving a car even turns the vehicle into an openair-design machine. At the end of the day...

Scent design influences the behaviour of people in crowds at Eindhoven

In addition to light, sound, color and other design dimensions scent is increasingly used to influence human emotions and behavior. Aromatherapy is the discipline that has developed this expertise and knowledge of centuries. Scent Marketing is currently an obvious case. But there are also non-commercial contexts as this story from...

Smell Culture Studies at the University of St. Gallen

The University of St. Gallen has long been known for its integrative view of economics, business administration, law, social science and the humanities. Given its holistic course architecture, the so-called contextual studies are a key pillar of the overall educational concept. Students, who are predominately enrolled in top ranked business...

How Present is Scent Marketing?

Sensory and scent-marketing highlight how the sense of smell affects our everyday purchasing decisions. Accordingly, one expects an abundance of scented products in contemporary consumer culture. Yet, we can also witness an increasing awareness of multiple chemical sensitivities that might promote an opposite trend. This is the commercial context of...

A Nose for Innovation: A Bernese Tradition?

The city of Bern runs a lively blog that monthly discusses business related issues in the economic area of the Swiss capital. Through it, a diverse selection of people from business, culture, civil service and society engage in public discourse. In this context, Claus Noppeney identifies “olfactory milestones” in the...

Scent Marketing

Scent marketing is the focus of the ongoing research project by Tobias Huwiler who studies in the Bachelor of Business Administration at Bern University of Applied Sciences.

Back to Top