Artistic perfumery has essentially been about the juice from its very beginning in the late 1970s: Jean Laporte started L’Artisan Parfumeur and  focused on the juice as well as its creator. Later on, corporate players became interested in this vibrant segment and launched their own niche lines. More recently, the Institute for Art and Olfaction (IAO) was created, signaling a comprehensive “new approach to the olfactory arts“ (Saskia Wilson-Brown, IAO founder’s statement, 2012). Consequently, the IAO’s prominent Art & Olfaction Awards highlight the artistry in perfumery. In fact, the awards propose to celebrate the value of the juice, and the juice alone.

Perfume-making – without a doubt – is a creative practice. Yet, our understanding of creativity is often limited. We basically think about the outstanding achievements of a creative genius without exploring the practices and strategies that underlie their creative solutions.

This talk opens the blackbox of creativity: It will focus on empirical data from case study research in the niche perfume industry, and outline the aesthetic and sensual practices that enable creative solutions in perfume-making.

It is apparent that the sense of smell can hardly be switched off at the workplace. Yet, business and management research has only recently started to explore its relevance. A number of research and transfer projects have been conducted at Bern University of Applied Sciences. And there is an upcoming forum to share and discuss this topic.

The Scent Culture Club is a collective hub for people interested in the sense of smell in culture, business and society. It offers group activities that explore this new relevant and topical theme while meeting new people. The activities examine the cultural significance and potentials of scent in contemporary life through workshops, readings, discussions, and talks with perfumers, researchers, and scholars; as well as cultural productions, urban interventions, and trips in and around the city of Zurich: